Fentanyl-Laced Marijuana Confirmed In Connecticut, Eyed In Dozens Of Overdoses

Health officials in Connecticut issued a warning about fentanyl-laced marijuana, which is being eyed in a rash of overdoses throughout the state. Since July, 39 overdoses requiring the use of naloxone for revival have been reported. In each case, the person involved said they had only smoked marijuana, but officials said they exhibited opioid symptoms. “This is the first lab-confirmed case of marijuana with fentanyl in Connecticut and possibly the first confirmed case in the United States,” said Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Manisha Juthani.

Read the full story here (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/fentanyl-laced-marijuana-connecticut-officials-warning/), originally posted on November 20, 2021 on CBSNews.com.

For more information on the International Academy on the Science and Impact of Cannabis, and to join, please visit www.IASIC1.org.

Visit the IASIC Library here (https://iasic1.org/library/). The IASIC Library is intended as a user-friendly reference of the published medical literature.

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