Listen to Addiction Psychiatrist Elizabeth “Libby” Stuyt’s discussion on High Truths on Drugs and Addiction, Episode #58

High potency THC is associated with psychosis and schizophrenia. Why are we not following the science? Join us with Dr. Elizabeth Stuyt as we discuss the concerning increase of THC potency in cannabis and how it can affect our brain. Increased paranoia, psychosis, and schizophrenia are examples of conditions we are seeing more and more of in our emergency rooms. When the toxicology report comes back, the only drug in their system is the high potency THC cannabis.

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About Elizabeth ‘Libby’ Stuyt, MD
Dr. Stuyt is a board-certified Addiction Psychiatrist and has worked in the addiction/behavioral health field since 1990. She was the Medical Director for the Circle Program, a 90-day inpatient treatment program, funded by the state of Colorado, for persons with co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse who have failed other levels of treatment from 1999 to 2020. She retired from this position in May 2020 in order to spend more time attempting to educate as many people as possible on the un-intended consequences she has seen from the commercialization of marijuana in Colorado, focusing primarily on the deleterious effects of high potency THC on the developing brain and mental health.

Listen to Episode #58 Now

 

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