Parents don’t realize psychosis dangers with cannabis, London psychiatrist warns

Sir Robin Murray, a professor at King’s College London, issued stern words of warning in a new interview: has caused psychosis in around 30 percent of the patients he sees at his practice in south London. “I think we’re now 100 percent sure that cannabis is one of the causes of a schizophrenia-like psychosis,” he told The Times.

Professor Murray and his colleagues in the early 2000s were among the first to establish a link between cannabis use and mental illnesses in young adults. To view one of his recent lectures on the topic, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USoXP4Z_rHA

To read the complete story, click here: https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/cannabis-warning-psychosis-london-b975634.html#comments-area

For more information on the International Academy on the Science and Impact of Cannabis, and to join, please visit www.IASIC1.org.

Visit the IASIC Library here (https://iasic1.org/library/). The IASIC Library is intended as a user-friendly reference of the published medical literature.

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