US Researchers Find Increased Likelihood of Arrhythmia Hospitalization in Youth With CUD

Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) was associated with a 47%-52% increased likelihood of arrhythmia hospitalizations in the younger population. The risk of association was controlled for confounders including other substances. Atrial fibrillation was the most prevalent arrhythmia raising concerns for stroke and other embolic events. This large national study compared 570,000 patients ages 15-54 who were admitted to the hospital between 2010-2014 for a primary diagnosis of arrhythmia (irregular heart rate). These patients were compared to 67,662,082 patients who did not have arrhythmia in the hospital.

Visit the IASIC Library to view medical literature on the harms of cannabis translated for public understanding.

Read the full article on PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34432919/

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