Vaping marijuana by teens doubles in last seven years, with potentially harmful consequences

Marijuana vaping by school-aged youth doubled between 2013 and 2020, a new study found, with reported use within the last 30 days rising seven-fold during the same time period. The study(https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2785376?guestAccessKey=4df985fe-e703-49cc-a46f-da461093574e&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=102521), published in JAMA Pediatrics, analyzed 17 studies conducted throughout Canada and the United States that involved nearly 200,000 adolescents. The study found that teens in their senior year of high school were most likely to be vaping marijuana compared to younger adolescents. In 2018, for example, one in three grade-12 students reported vaping weed.

The use of marijuana by teens — in any form — is concerning because weed affects the adolescent brain differently, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The teen brain is actively developing and often will not be fully developed until the mid 20s,” the CDC stated, adding that use during that time “can have permanent effects” such as poor coordination and damage to learning, memory, problem-solving skills, and the ability to pay attention.

To read the full article, click here: https://www.cnn.com/2021/10/25/health/marijuana-teen-vaping-wellness/index.html

For more information on the International Academy on the Science and Impact of Cannabis, and to join, please visit www.IASIC1.org.

Visit the IASIC Library here (https://iasic1.org/library/). The IASIC Library is intended as a user-friendly reference of the published medical literature.

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